Indien Amerique http://indien-amerique.com/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 13:25:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://indien-amerique.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-24-120x120.png Indien Amerique http://indien-amerique.com/ 32 32 Hudson Valley Native American History comes to life in Greenburgh https://indien-amerique.com/hudson-valley-native-american-history-comes-to-life-in-greenburgh/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 12:44:01 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/hudson-valley-native-american-history-comes-to-life-in-greenburgh/ November 25, 2021, 12:43 p.m.Updated 40 m ago Through: News 12 Staff Find out how this land we walk on was used thousands of years ago on this road trip: near you at the Greenburgh Nature Center. There is no shortage of history in the Hudson Valley, especially Native American history, and there are educational […]]]>

Find out how this land we walk on was used thousands of years ago on this road trip: near you at the Greenburgh Nature Center.

There is no shortage of history in the Hudson Valley, especially Native American history, and there are educational programs to teach you everything at the center. “They had a culture, they had music, they had art, they had different engagements with different communities. It was such a rich and rich culture and heritage and unfortunately not enough people know it. “said Travis Brady of Greenburgh. Nature center.

Visitors can immerse themselves in the world of the Hudson Valley’s original inhabitants with structures like a longhouse. “These are all natural materials, there is no metal, there are no screws. There is nothing really current building material in there. They would have built it, that would have been a learned technique that you would have passed on to your family and children, ”says Brady.

In the center’s Native American Replica Village, visitors learned how the tribes not only survived, but thrived, only because of their natural surroundings. “When people come to our program, they will certainly learn that the tribes were known as the East Wood Indians, and we sort of tie the woods to the ‘store.’ Whatever you need, you go to the woods, ”says Brady.

These woods provided everything, including how to build canoes! “It’s a single piece of wood from a tree trunk, doing this today with saws, chainsaws and axes is quite simple, but to do it with stone, bones and fire, it takes a little more knowledge and skill, ”says Brady.

During your walk you will also come across a life-size wigwam – another style of housing 6,000 years ago.

You will also see what preparing a meal would have looked like.

Next, head to the animals at the center of nature. Some played quite an important role in the lives of early humans, such as bald eagles!

And at the barnyard, let your new furry friends take care of your day.


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Members of the Mattaponi and Pamunkey tribes of India allege racism and sexism in tribal leadership | Richmond Local News https://indien-amerique.com/members-of-the-mattaponi-and-pamunkey-tribes-of-india-allege-racism-and-sexism-in-tribal-leadership-richmond-local-news/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 19:16:00 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/members-of-the-mattaponi-and-pamunkey-tribes-of-india-allege-racism-and-sexism-in-tribal-leadership-richmond-local-news/ The Mattaponi are one of the few tribes in the country to prevent women from voting or being in the leadership, she said. The management consists of Chief Mark Custalow, a Deputy Chief and three advisers. Gloria Custalow said they were “self-proclaimed” and that there had been no elections since the 1970s. If women cannot […]]]>

The Mattaponi are one of the few tribes in the country to prevent women from voting or being in the leadership, she said. The management consists of Chief Mark Custalow, a Deputy Chief and three advisers. Gloria Custalow said they were “self-proclaimed” and that there had been no elections since the 1970s.

If women cannot participate, the number of registrations will decline, threatening the existence of the tribe, she said. She has been pushing for change on booking since 2016.

“If we don’t do something now, I don’t see a good future for the Mattaponi tribe,” said Gloria Custalow.

Recently, Gloria and other members delivered letters to Mark Custalow’s home saying they did not recognize him and the tribal leader. Mark Custalow called the police. The 12 protesters were not arrested, but Mark Custalow filed a lawsuit against the protesters for trespassing and mob assault, the Virginia Mercury reported.

Under the terms of a 1677 peace treaty, members of the Mattaponi and Pamunkey tribes deliver slaughtered animals to the governor before each Thanksgiving in exchange for not paying taxes. Tribal leaders, who did not immediately respond to requests for comment, met with Governor Ralph Northam on Wednesday, the 344th time the ritual has been performed.

Wednesday’s protest by tribal members took place immediately after the tribal leaders met with Northam.


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Native American tribes pushing for return of 6,000 remains receive boost in their case https://indien-amerique.com/native-american-tribes-pushing-for-return-of-6000-remains-receive-boost-in-their-case/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 05:07:18 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/native-american-tribes-pushing-for-return-of-6000-remains-receive-boost-in-their-case/ Native American tribes pushing for the return of nearly 6,000 human remains and burial artefacts from a former settlement in Alabama have received assistance in their case from a federal advisory committee. A petition has been filed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and five other tribes under federal law for […]]]>

Native American tribes pushing for the return of nearly 6,000 human remains and burial artefacts from a former settlement in Alabama have received assistance in their case from a federal advisory committee.

A petition has been filed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and five other tribes under federal law for the return of “human remains of our ancestors” and funeral objects held by the University. of Alabama and its Moundville Archaeological Park. The tribes filed a petition after failing to retrieve the items, tribal officials said.

The Native American Burial Protection and Repatriation Review Committee found a “preponderance of evidence of cultural affiliation” between the Muscogee-speaking tribes known to live near the former settlement and its remains and artifacts . After the discovery, tribal officials said the University of Alabama would violate federal law if the items were not returned to the tribes.

“We have asked for the return of our ancestors for years, and the apologies for the delay have ended. With the discovery that the remains and grave goods found at Moundville are culturally affiliated with the seven tribes who requested their return, there is no “There is no reason to wait any longer. The time has come for our ancestors to rest in peace,” said David Hill, Senior Chief of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, in a statement.

“5,892 of our ancestors deserve a proper burial. They don’t deserve to be in a box in the University of Alabama basement,” Hill added.

For more Associated Press reporting, see below.

In this 2002 archive photo, Eugene Futato, senior archaeologist and curator of archaeological collections at the Office of Archaeological Services, pulls out a drawer of Mississippi Indian ceramic vessels from Moundville, Moundville, Alabama. Leaders of several Native American tribes are asking the University of Alabama to return nearly 6,000 human remains and artifacts from the school’s archaeological park and museum.
Mike Kittrell / Mobile check-in via AP

“We stand before you today to fight for the return of our ancestors – ancestors who were taken from their resting places for what – research, for development and often more common, but horribly tragic, because archeology was someone’s favorite pastime, ”Tina Osceola of the Seminole tribe of Florida said during a presentation to the committee.

The Alabama site, known simply as Moundville because of the large mounds of earth that were built there, was occupied from around 1020 to 1650, according to the presentation. Although its former name is unknown, the city in its heyday was one of the largest Native American settlements in North America, according to the university. But it was largely abandoned by the time European explorers arrived in the region.

The Federal Native American Burials Protection and Repatriation Act 1990 requires federally funded institutions, such as universities, to return Native American cultural remains and artifacts to direct descendants, Indian tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations. . However, the comeback has been slow and complicated when sites, such as the Alabama Colony, predate written history.

The tribes argued Tuesday that there is linguistic, oral and archaeological evidence that the occupants of Moundville were their ancestors.

Muskogean-speaking tribes were the only tribes living within 225 kilometers of the Alabama site when European explorers arrived in the area, according to the tribal officials’ submission. They said oral traditions place the tribal creation near Moundville or speak of large regional gatherings in centers like Moundville. They also said DNA evidence showed a strong genetic link between the Seven Tribes.

Tens of thousands of indigenous peoples, including the Muscogee Nation, were forcibly evicted from their ancestral lands by the US government between 1830 and 1850 during the devastating Trail of Tears.

One of the six committee members abstained in Tuesday’s vote because the committee had not heard from representatives of the university.

In a recent letter to tribal leaders, James T. Dalton, executive vice president and rector of the University of Alabama, said the university hopes to work with the tribes. Dalton said the University of Alabama will provide more suggestions on “the most productive and efficient way to meet the pending joint demand.”

While nearly 83,000 remains in the United States have been returned to their descendants under federal law, the National Park Service says the remains of approximately 116,000 Native Americans are still being held in institutions across the country. Many of them had not been culturally affiliated with a tribe.

Petition, Moundville, Human Remains, Artifacts
The Native American tribes demand that nearly 6,000 human remains and burial objects held at the University of Alabama be returned to them, so that they can properly bury their ancestors. In this photo there are mounds made by Native Americans from Mississippi called Moundville, Alabama.
R. Krubner / ClassicStock / Getty Images


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Native American logos still used by some Wisconsin police departments https://indien-amerique.com/native-american-logos-still-used-by-some-wisconsin-police-departments/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 12:05:07 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/native-american-logos-still-used-by-some-wisconsin-police-departments/ The governments of the Indigenous nations of Wisconsin are officially opposed to the use of Indigenous mascots and logos by schools and other organizations, but many non-tribal entities continue to use them. While there has been a concerted effort to demand the removal of these mascots from state schools from groups such as the Wisconsin […]]]>

The governments of the Indigenous nations of Wisconsin are officially opposed to the use of Indigenous mascots and logos by schools and other organizations, but many non-tribal entities continue to use them.

While there has been a concerted effort to demand the removal of these mascots from state schools from groups such as the Wisconsin Indian Education Association, officials say their opposition also extends to the many police departments that use native logos.

“All of the tribes residing in Wisconsin reject discriminatory mascots in the strongest terms,” ​​said Flambeau Lake Ojibwe Nation President John D. Johnson Sr. in images.

Tribal leaders argue that not only is it wrong for non-tribal entities to use logos, but they are also often very inaccurate and stereotypical.



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Bill seeks to improve access to health care for urban Native Americans https://indien-amerique.com/bill-seeks-to-improve-access-to-health-care-for-urban-native-americans/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:20:17 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/bill-seeks-to-improve-access-to-health-care-for-urban-native-americans/ President Joe Biden participates remotely in a summit of tribal nations from the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC on November 15, addressing tribal leaders and announcing a number of measures to improve public safety and justice for Native Americans. Photo by Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA-EFE WASHINGTON, November 22 (UPI) – A proposed […]]]>

President Joe Biden participates remotely in a summit of tribal nations from the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC on November 15, addressing tribal leaders and announcing a number of measures to improve public safety and justice for Native Americans. Photo by Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA-EFE

WASHINGTON, November 22 (UPI) – A proposed amendment to India’s Improved Healthcare Act aims to improve access to healthcare for American Indians who live in urban areas, its advocates say.

The Urban Indian Health Confer Act would require the Department of Health and Human Services to consult with 41 Indian organizations – nonprofit organizations governed by Native Americans – on health policies for the 2.8 million Indians in the country. America and Alaska Natives who live in urban areas.

The bill was introduced by Representative Raul Grijalva, DN.M., and co-sponsored by 19 members of the House. It was passed by the House on November 2 and awaits action from the Senate.

About 70 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives live in urban areas and face inequalities in access to health care because the Department of Health and Human Services is not required to consult with urban organizations when creating policies that impact urban Indians, Grijalva said.

American Indians began to move to urban areas after the enactment of the Indian Relocation Act of 1956. The law prompted American Indians and Alaskan Natives to live in urban areas in their country. promising housing, jobs and health care.

Other American Indians left reserve lands to pursue higher education and employment opportunities.

According to the Home Office, the United States has a fiduciary duty to provide American Indians with health care, education, and social protection in return for colonizing Indigenous lands. This fiduciary responsibility also follows individuals once they leave reserve lands.

Limited health care options

Yet for many American Indians leaving tribal lands, health care options are limited.

For Grijalva, the Urban Indian Health Confer Act would improve parity between urban natives and American Indians living on tribal lands.

“Passing the Urban Indian Health Confer Act will give urban Indian health organizations a critical role in planning and decision-making for Alaska Natives and American Indians. I look forward to working with my Senate counterparts to bring this bill across the finish line. and on the president’s desk, ”Grijalva said in a November 2 press release.

Sunny Stevenson (Walker River Paiute), director of federal relations for the National Urban Indian Health Council, said urban Indian organizations were under-resourced, underfunded, and not found in all metropolitan areas at all.

Stevenson said the bill supporting urban Indians would not reduce funding for the IHS or disadvantage Indians living on reserves.

“A policy of urban consultation with any part of the administration does not conflict with, supplant or undermine any tribal consultation or government-to-government relationship,” Stevenson said.

Monumental benefits

RoxAnne Unabia (Chippewa), executive director of the American Indian Health Service in Chicago, said the benefits of the act of conferring would be monumental.

“We hope that through the urban conference we can explain and discuss with Congress how much money is needed for urban natives,” Unabia said. “I have so many people who choose to pay for their heating rather than come for a visit.”

With additional funding, Unabia hopes to hire specialists, such as rheumatologists and cardiologists, to come to the clinic to better help Indians in towns.

American Indians are disproportionately affected by health problems, including lower life expectancy and higher rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, according to the Indian Health Service.

Unabia said the clinic has to outsource appointments, which means city dwellers pay more and wait longer. Additional funding could also lower the co-payment for drugs, which many of his patients cannot afford.

“Our patients have to choose between paying utilities, paying rent and buying prescriptions. And they want to continue living at home. They want a roof over their heads and that of their families,” he said. she declared.

Lack of health insurance

Unabia said 40% of its patients are uninsured because they are not eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, and many urban natives do not have health insurance.

“When the families were on the reserve, we were always told it was part of your treaty right to receive health care,” Unabia said. “But the US government never fully fulfilled the treaty obligations.”

For Stevenson, an urban conference would be the first step towards improving the health of urban Indians, but conferences must be monitored to be successful. She said it is important for urban Indian organizations to complete a satisfaction survey after consulting a federal agency. Then the comments of the Indian Urban Organization should be made public immediately.

“If the administration is to increase transparency, remain accountable and be held to a high standard, it is important that it publishes the results of the investigation as they arrive,” Stevenson said.

A conference would become almost pointless, Stevenson said, if federal agencies don’t respond quickly. She recommended 30 to 60 days.

Stevenson said federal agencies will also need to establish a point of contact to communicate with urban Indian organizations. The resource person must not only relay the information, but also be able to influence the change, she added.

“If you have people out there who are just there to listen and relay information, that’s really insufficient,” Stevenson said. “You have to have people out there who can agree to make commitments on behalf of Indians. ”


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Native American History, Lake Street Murals, and an Old Lady Who’s a Killer – Twin Cities https://indien-amerique.com/native-american-history-lake-street-murals-and-an-old-lady-whos-a-killer-twin-cities/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 15:45:13 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/native-american-history-lake-street-murals-and-an-old-lady-whos-a-killer-twin-cities/ Here’s some fiction and non-fiction that Minnesotans would love to see under the Christmas tree, including Lake Street murals, Native American history, and an old lady who’s a killer. “An elderly lady must not be crossed” by Helene Tursten, translated by Marlaine Delargy (Soho Crime, $ 14.99) I picked up this little dandy hardcover, about […]]]>

Here’s some fiction and non-fiction that Minnesotans would love to see under the Christmas tree, including Lake Street murals, Native American history, and an old lady who’s a killer.

“An elderly lady must not be crossed” by Helene Tursten, translated by Marlaine Delargy (Soho Crime, $ 14.99)

I picked up this little dandy hardcover, about 4 inches by 6 inches, one night I wanted something to take me out of my world. A Swedish author did the job with this connected news featuring 88-year-old Maud. Clever and sour, Maud is a murderer, but only for the best of reasons.

Tursten’s work includes the 10-book series starring Detective Irene Huss (who makes an appearance in “An Elderly Lady…”), as well as “An Elderly Lady Is Up to No Good”.

In the new book, Maud is finally rich enough to take a trip to Africa after years of caring for her helpless sister. Did Charlotte fall in that stairwell or was she pushed? Maud doesn’t remember it very well.

As Maud sits in business class with all the amenities, her mind returns to her victims, even though she doesn’t see them that way. There is the horrible woman who went back to teaching, toppling Maud on the faculty. She was killed by a falling ice cube. The selfish adult man who wanted his mother to sell his apartment to pay off his gambling debts ate gingerbread that he disagreed with. And in Cape Town, Maud’s favorite place in the world, she takes care of a man who attacks a young girl, leading to a new direction in her life.

The author’s description of Maud acting like a picky old lady when questioned by detectives is priceless.

Tursten must have fans here in Minnesota because this book was on the Midwest’s bestseller list. Now I know why.

“Snowblind Moon: Spirit Lake Massacre” text and images by Gary Kelley (Ice Cube Press, $ 19.99)

“Dovetails in the tall grass” by Samantha Specks (Spark Press, $ 16.95)

These first two historical fiction novels, on the white colonization of Native American lands, could be read as one long and bloody story.

“Moon of the Snow-Blind” is a graphic novel about the massacre of Indians and Whites at Spirit Lake, Iowa in 1857. This massacre is a precursor to the war between the United States and Dakota of 1862, which took place around New Ulm, after which 38 Indian men were hanged. This is the story of “Dovetails in the Tall Grass”.

Neither author dismisses the blame, telling their stories from the point of view of whites and Indians. Characters in both books know that the Indigenous world is changing as the federal government lies, breaks treaties, and leaves the Dakotas (Sioux) hungry as they are pushed further west into the Great Plains by a flood of Wasichu (the whites) who take their land and kill all the game and bison.

“Moon of the Snow-Blind,” based on the autobiography of captive white woman, Abbe Gardner, confronts readers with Kelley’s crude black and white drawings of bloody bodies, terrified faces with bulging eyes, atrocities and battles. But his designs of wild animals are magnificent, from owls to bison, elk to squirrels.

The Dakota saw the whites take their homeland and their culture, and their anger turned against six white families who settled in the Lake District of northwest Iowa around Spirit Lake, sacred to the Dakota. There were skirmishes; Indians slaughtered settler cattle, starving Dakota women were whipped by white men for snooping in frozen cornfields during one of Iowa’s worst winters.

Inkpaduta was at the head of the Indians during the battle. By the end of the fighting, 19 settlers were dead, including six children. The Dakota took four prisoners: Abbe, Margaret Marble, Lydia Noble, and Elizabeth Thatcher. Hunted down by militias and military, the Indians took their captives north to Minnesota and then west to what is now South Dakota. Two of the captives died; Lydia was beaten to death by the chief’s son. Abbe was eventually rescued by friendly Dakotas with the help of Minnesota Indian agent Charles Flandrau.

Abbe lived until 1921, the last survivor of the massacre. In the darkest days of her captivity, she wrote: “My hope of ever escaping this bitter bondage has completely vanished.

Although the Spirit Lake massacre ended with a reception in St. Paul’s, relations between the Whites and the Dakota deteriorated until, five years later, the war between the United States and the Dakota no longer unleash carnage.

“Dovetails in the Tall Grass” begins in May 1861. The two cultures are seen through the eyes of 16-year-old Dakota Oenikika and white Emma Heard, who lives in New Ulm. Oenikika is the obedient daughter of Chief Little Crow, and Emma is the devoted daughter of the town lawyer, overwhelmed by land claim documents as settlers keep arriving.

Author Specks, a licensed independent clinical social worker, does a painstaking job of showing the lives of girls in their cultures.

Oenikika is proud to be the daughter of a great Dakota chief and loves her life and the loved ones around her in the camp. She is good at women’s work, such as tanning hides, but her specialty is medicine. She knows what herbs and what plans to pick to cure diseases and injuries, and when people are moved further west, she is bowled over by the fact that the herbal remedies she knows so well do not grow there. .

Emma wants to be a teacher, inspired by the woman who encouraged her in her studies. During this time, she works in her father’s law firm, then as an archivist when Indian male captives are brought to justice.

The two young women never meet, but their fates merge when the Indians attack New Ulm and Emma’s mute sister is thrown to the ground by a brave young man ready to rape. He is stopped by another Indian as Emma looks at him in horror. She will never forget the face of her sister’s savior.

Oenikika is getting married and her father, who has been to Washington twice to speak with the president, insists they move into a white man’s house when they are forced to register on a reservation. It shames his daughter, who looks longingly at campfires from afar and her teepee is bored.

After the killings, the people split up, but a small group remains with the leader, heading west to other members of the Sioux Nation. Oenikika accompanies her, mourning her husband who has not returned with the war group.

When Indians are tried and Emma is the courtroom secretary, she realizes the injustice of having men tried in groups without a lawyer or the opportunity to speak. Her belief in the justice system, encouraged by her father, is shaken. When she recognizes among the prisoners the Indian who saved her sister, she swears to protect him. This is Tashunke, Oenikika’s husband.

We’re going to leave the story there, except to say that the 39th noose was never used.

“Highway 61 through Minnesota” by Nathan Johnson (Arcadia Publishing, $ 23.99)

This is one of those books that are always welcome as gifts, because whatever the reader’s taste is, it is fun to read and the photos will bring memories to those who drove from the Twin Cities north on the highway 61 before highway construction. As well as being an interesting read, it could also be used as a travel guide for outings in Minnesota next summer. Or you can go to Grand Portage in January if you’re tough enough.

Johnson, a historian and author from Minnesota, divides the long highway into four sections – The North Shore Drive (Grand Portage in Duluth on Minnesota 61), Twin Ports in Twin Cities (Duluth in Wyoming on Old Highway 61), The Southeastern Bluffs ( Wyoming to La Crescent on US Highway 61) and the Road Trip South (from Wisconsin to Louisiana on Highway 61).

Driving the 1,400 miles, Johnson writes in his introduction, was “the trip of a lifetime” and he would do it again. He writes about motels and landmarks, restaurants and the vibe of small towns.

“It made you especially proud of our Minnesota portion of Highway 61 and all it has to offer,” he continues. “Highway 61 is America’s north-south route, and it definitely offers motorists a one-of-a-kind experience.”

“St Paul: an urban biography” by Bill Lindeke (Minnesota Historical Society Press, $ 18.95)

Another giveaway, this one is packed with information about “the old river town,” as Garrison Keillor puts it.

Lindeke is an urban geographer, author of “Minneapolis-St. Paul: Yesterday and now. So he knows what he’s talking about, whether it’s the massive 1883 parade in St. Paul celebrating the completion of the North Pacific Railroad to the West Coast, or the why and how the Interstate I-94 tore the community of Rondo apart.

The eight chapters of the book begin with the Native Americans who lived here for centuries before the arrival of the whites. It goes through the rapid growth of St. Paul (born when Pig’s Eye Parrant sold alcohol to people who were evicted from Fort Snelling), the 19th century depression, the 20th century crisis, and a rebirth in the 1970s.

We’ve all heard parts of that story, but Lindeke packs his tale with facts, written in a simple style.

There are maps and pictures, including handcuffed gangster Alvin Karpas, and one from 1858 of the wooden wheeled oxcarts carrying fur that we all learned in history class (or at least we did). did in the 1950s). It comes from an art gallery in Saint-Paul and the post describes the drivers as “half-bloods”.

There are also interesting boxes on topics such as the history of St. Paul Union Depot and the State Fair.

Lindeke’s prologue is so true you know he’s lived here his whole life. Here is part of the opening paragraph:

“My father’s family has been in Saint-Paul for five generations, in the territorial era, but my mother is from Canada. During those early years, I was told, she was learning to be a true Saint Paulist, someone who knew the difference between Phalen and Como, who understood why it made perfect sense for the West Side to be in the south… to love St. Paul must keep in your heart an indignant pride about such things.

Alright, Bill. You are so right.

“Lake Street Speaks: Collection of Poetry and Art for Social Justice” compiled by Susan B. Shields, poetry by Rasauenea Ambers-Winston ($ 39.99)

While driving through Minneapolis recently, lost (as usual), I first saw George Floyd Square and some of the artwork on the fences and surrounding buildings. You can read about this piece of art, but nothing prepares you for its vibrancy and direct messages.

In this book, we see all the emotions the community felt after Floyd’s murder.

This work of art is magnificent. It’s big, bold, colorful, beautiful in a new way. It forces you to be careful. And that is, of course, the point.

Former business owner Susan Shields, a mentor to women entrepreneurs, leaders and artists, wanted to save this street art for future generations and support people of color. She collaborated with African-American poet Ambers-Winston to compile this oversized 78-page softback paperback, which calls for greater tolerance and peace.

All profits from book sales will be donated to BIOPC non-profit organizations. Ordering information: Artmobile.com.


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Here are the 12 Native American tribes of the Inland Empire recognized by the federal government – San Bernardino Sun https://indien-amerique.com/here-are-the-12-native-american-tribes-of-the-inland-empire-recognized-by-the-federal-government-san-bernardino-sun/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 04:24:50 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/here-are-the-12-native-american-tribes-of-the-inland-empire-recognized-by-the-federal-government-san-bernardino-sun/ Before there were Riverside, San Bernardino, Redlands or Rancho Cucamonga, the Inland Empire was home to indigenous communities for thousands of years. According to the crowd-sourced Terre-Native.ca website, the Inland Empire once housed the Tongva, who would have inhabited southern California for up to 3,500 years; the Payómkawichum (Liseño); Kizh; Cahuilla, who say they arrived […]]]>

Before there were Riverside, San Bernardino, Redlands or Rancho Cucamonga, the Inland Empire was home to indigenous communities for thousands of years.

According to the crowd-sourced Terre-Native.ca website, the Inland Empire once housed the Tongva, who would have inhabited southern California for up to 3,500 years; the Payómkawichum (Liseño); Kizh; Cahuilla, who say they arrived in the region 5,000 years ago; and the Yuhaviatam/Maarenga’yam Tribes (Serrano) – all of which survive today under multiple names in several federally recognized tribes.

There may already have been 300 tribes in Southern California, according to Gerald Clarke, professor of ethnic studies at UC Riverside and member of the Cahuilla Band of Indians. But “a lot of them have just been wiped off the face of the earth,” he said.

Many did not survive Spanish and American colonization, Clarke said, especially following the huge waves of western immigration in the 19th century, starting with the California Gold Rush and the arrival of tens of thousands of Americans in the upstate in search of wealth.

“It’s the complexity of the history of this nation,” Clarke said. “If the Gold Rush had been in Southern California, I probably wouldn’t be here today… my tribe wouldn’t be here today.

Tribes that have survived may or may not have federal recognition, which entitles tribes and their members to federal services and resources.

“There are 110 federally recognized tribes” nationally, Clarke said.


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San Bernardino County Unveils Historical Exhibit With Inland Empire Native American Tribes | News from the Empire of the Interior https://indien-amerique.com/san-bernardino-county-unveils-historical-exhibit-with-inland-empire-native-american-tribes-news-from-the-empire-of-the-interior/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 23:33:00 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/san-bernardino-county-unveils-historical-exhibit-with-inland-empire-native-american-tribes-news-from-the-empire-of-the-interior/ For the first time in Inland Empire history, San Bernardino County officials recognized Native American tribal lands by announcing that its museums – including the San Bernardino County Museum (Redlands), Victor Valley Museum ( Apple Valley) and Yucaipa Adobe – are located in the ancestral territory of the Maara’yam (Serrano) people. San Bernardino County recently […]]]>

For the first time in Inland Empire history, San Bernardino County officials recognized Native American tribal lands by announcing that its museums – including the San Bernardino County Museum (Redlands), Victor Valley Museum ( Apple Valley) and Yucaipa Adobe – are located in the ancestral territory of the Maara’yam (Serrano) people.

San Bernardino County recently joined elected leaders of the San Manuel Mission Indian Band, Morongo Mission Indian Band, California State Senate and Assembly of the State of California to celebrate the unveiling of a written proclamation at the entrance to the San Bernardino County Museum. .

“It is a privilege for San Bernardino County to honor the Native American heritage of our region at the entrance to our museum in Redlands,” said Curt Hagman, Chairman of the Board. “It is important that our children and all who visit our museum and our county are aware of the people and culture that once thrived on this land and thrive in our community to this day.”

For the first time in living memory, the Serrano language will be given priority both written and oral in a public space in San Bernardino County.

The ceremony opened on indigenous traditions, including the song of birds, preparing the leaders of the three groups to unveil a new entrance exhibit of an official recognition of the ancestral land presented in Serrano, English and Spanish. .

The proclamation exhibition and event celebrated and recognized the common heritage that exists between the county and the indigenous Maara’yam (Serrano) people.


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The celebration of Native American Heritage Month and the Black Indian and Native American Indian Month Fair will be held at the Arkansas Post this Saturday https://indien-amerique.com/the-celebration-of-native-american-heritage-month-and-the-black-indian-and-native-american-indian-month-fair-will-be-held-at-the-arkansas-post-this-saturday/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/the-celebration-of-native-american-heritage-month-and-the-black-indian-and-native-american-indian-month-fair-will-be-held-at-the-arkansas-post-this-saturday/ John Horse served the Seminole Maroons, a group of free African Americans and runaway slaves who joined forces with the Seminole Indians. He was a warrior, diplomat and patriarch and represented their interests in Washington, DC and Mexico City. Its story is among several used to represent the relationship between Native Americans and African Americans. […]]]>
John Horse served the Seminole Maroons, a group of free African Americans and runaway slaves who joined forces with the Seminole Indians. He was a warrior, diplomat and patriarch and represented their interests in Washington, DC and Mexico City. Its story is among several used to represent the relationship between Native Americans and African Americans.

The celebration of Native American Heritage Month and the fourth annual Black Indian and Native American Month Fair will be held this Saturday, November 20 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Arkansas Post National Memorial at 1741 Old Post Road in Gillett.

Dr Daniel Littlefield, director of the Sequoyah National Research Center at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and author Jason Irby will host the event.

“There I met Dr. Dan Littlefield at the Sequoyah National Research Center who was doing research for my research project. All of these years later, we ended up getting together and working on a project to raise awareness of the relationship between Native Americans and African Americans, ”Irby said.

The Sequoyah National Research Center, Black History Commission of Arkansas, interpreters from the Arkansas Post National Memorial, and the Cherokees for Black Indian History Preservation will be making presentations at this special event.

The ways African Americans and Native Americans came together and the history of their relationship will be explained at the heritage fair. Dr Littlefield said the presenters will also discuss the history of Native Americans who crossed the Grande Prairie.

“We have spent over 20 years here at the center studying Indian elimination or the trail of tears as the popular term is,” said Dr. Littlefield. “For five large Southeastern tribes, when they were forced to move west, they all passed through Arkansas. The Arkansas Post was a primary point of entry for those arriving by steamboat. Some elements of these five tribes have been there.

Dr Littlefield said many residents are unaware of the historical significance of the Arkansas Post National Memorial Site.

“There is very little interpretation of this event at the Arkansas Post. We would really like to see some interest generated,” said Dr. Littlefield.

Presenters will discuss potential updates to the images and exhibits at the Arkansas Post National Memorial site that would commemorate the journey of Native Americans to the area.

“This road has not been marked at all. Stuttgart is one of the stars on this route. We would like to see activity generated to generate local interest in this regard. I think this meeting could kick start some of that, ”Dr Littlefield said.

The heritage fair is free and free food will be provided.

COVID-19 protocols will be respected. National Park Service rules and policies will also be followed.


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Indian tribes demand return of remains, artifacts from Alabama | national https://indien-amerique.com/indian-tribes-demand-return-of-remains-artifacts-from-alabama-national/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 16:31:45 +0000 https://indien-amerique.com/indian-tribes-demand-return-of-remains-artifacts-from-alabama-national/ Seven tribes are asking an Alabama university to return the remains of nearly 6,000 people excavated over the years in what was once one of the largest Native American settlements in North America. The Oklahoma-based Muscogee Nation, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and five other tribes have filed a petition under federal law for the […]]]>

Seven tribes are asking an Alabama university to return the remains of nearly 6,000 people excavated over the years in what was once one of the largest Native American settlements in North America.

The Oklahoma-based Muscogee Nation, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and five other tribes have filed a petition under federal law for the return of 5,982 “human remains of our ancestors” and grave goods now held by the University of Alabama and its Moundville Archaeological Park.

“They are human beings. We consider them to be our grandparents, ”said Raelynn Butler, responsible for historical and cultural preservation of the Muscogee Nation, in an interview.

Butler said the tribes are seeking return so the remains can be reburied along with the grave goods. In a letter to tribal officials on Friday, James T. Dalton, executive vice president and rector of the University of Alabama, said the university hopes to work with the tribes.

The Alabama site, known simply as Moundville because of the large mounds of earth that were built there, was once home to what was believed to be a large and prosperous settlement.

Although its former name is unknown, the city was founded around 1120 and at its peak was one of the largest Native American settlements in North America, according to the University. The site consisted of a large plaza and 26 mounds of earth. It later fell into decline, although it was used as a place of ceremony and burial ground. It was largely abandoned by the 1500s.

The University of Alabama-run site and museum is now a regular stop for elementary school students on field trips.

Tens of thousands of indigenous peoples, including the Muscogee Nation, were forcibly evicted from their ancestral lands by the US government between 1830 and 1850 during the devastating Trail of Tears.

Officials from the Muskogee Nation came to Alabama this week to meet with officials from the university and deliver a letter to the governor.

“The remains held by the University were left behind when our ancestors were forced to leave our ancestral homes in the Southeastern United States and other states by the nene estvmerkv or ‘road to misery’, also known as the “Trail of Tears,” David W Hill, Chief Chief of the Muscogee Nation and Chief Gary Batton wrote letters to Governor Kay Ivey.

“While no one can change the past, we hope you will help encourage others to do what is right in the present,” they added.

The Federal Native American Burials Protection and Repatriation Act 1990 requires federally funded institutions, such as universities, to return Native American cultural remains and objects to direct descendants, Indian tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations. . However, the comeback has been slow to come.

While nearly 83,000 remains in the United States have been returned to their descendants, the National Park Service says the remains of approximately 116,000 Native Americans are still being held by institutions across the country. Many of them have not been linked to a particular tribe – a term known as “culturally affiliated” – which authorizes the return.

The settlement of Moundville predates modern tribes, but the Seven Tribes maintain that they are related by lineage and language. Tribal officials are calling on the Native American Burial Protection and Repatriation Review Committee to declare the site culturally affiliated with the tribes in order to pave the way for the return of the remains. A hearing is scheduled for next week.

“We still have a lot of work to do in the South East. Only 26% of the ancestor remains that were unearthed or excavated in the southeastern states were returned or repatriated to the tribes through the NAGPR process, ”said Butler.

Dalton said the University of Alabama will provide more suggestions on “the most productive and efficient way to meet the pending joint demand.”

“We hope that by joining the tribes in consultation, all parties can reaffirm their common goals of honoring and preserving the cultural heritage of the Moundville civilization,” Dalton wrote.

The tribe is asking for the return of the remains and items taken from Moundville since 2018 and “so far have failed to secure a legitimate return,” they wrote.

“We hope the university will do the right thing. We hope the state urges the university to do the right thing, ”Muskogee Creek Ambassador Jonodev O. Chaudhuri said.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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